MY NAME IS KIM BOK-DONG

The documentary My Name Is Kim Bok Dong opened in Korean theaters on August 8, during a time of already tense relations over trade issues between Korea and Japan. The film’s topic relates to another ongoing and contentious negotiation between the two governments, concerning compensation for the enslaved Korean women forced to serve as “comfort women” for Japanese soldiers during World War II.

The subject of the film, human rights activist, Kim Bok Dong, died in January 2019, at the age of 93, after a 27-year-battle to get Japan to acknowledge its wartime actions. Although exact numbers are hard to document, it’s estimated that as many as 200,000 Korean women were forced into sexual servitude during the war, an enslavement that resulted in physical and psychological trauma. Many women died.

Kim, who grew up in what she once described as a “tight knit family,” said she was taken away by the Japanese military at the age of 14, ostensibly to work in a factory. Instead, she said that she was forced to become a sex slave.

DIRECTED BY: Song Won-Geun
RELEASED: 2019
DURATION: 107 minutes
COUNTRY: South Korea

 

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the director


IN THE FRAME OF KOREAN FILM FESTIVAL


08.11 I 19:00 – TICKETS

ORIGINAL LANGUAGE
Korean

DATE
08.11 I 19:00

SUBTITLES

PLACE
Cinema Galeries
Galerie de la Reine 26
1000 Brussels

PRICE
 8 / 6 € (+0,50c Online, Std.) / UGC Unlimited / Article 27